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American Airlines - Latin America/Mexico Fact Sheet


Overview
In 20 years, American Airlines has become Latin America’s premier airline, offering more flights to more destinations there than any other carrier.  And, its commitment can be seen in its investment in resources, routes and -- most importantly -- in its people. 

Investing In Routes
American began flying to Mexico in 1941 and to Latin America in 1987 -- with service to Caracas, Venezuela.  But it wasn’t until 1989 -- when American acquired Eastern Airlines’ routes into Central and South America for approximately $430 million -- that American became a major carrier to the region.  The Eastern routes originated from Miami International Airport (MIA), where American had just 18 flights a day and about 200 employees in 1989.

Today, MIA is American’s second largest hub and its gateway to the Southern Hemisphere, with more than 9,000 employees and 300 flights.  American’s Latin America/Mexico route system encompasses 46 destinations in 17 countries (includes nine American Eagle destinations in Mexico).

In addition to offering service between Miami and Latin America, American has Latin American/Mexico service from New York-Kennedy, Dallas/Fort Worth, Chicago/O’Hare, Los Angeles and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and together with regional carrier, American Eagle now serves 18 Mexican destinations.***

Investing In People
Most important to American’s success in Latin America are its employees based throughout the region -- almost 100% of whom are nationals of the countries in which they work.  They are responsible for developing ties to the local communities, governments and business leaders and for opening up the marketplace to American Airlines.

Investing In Resources
American is committed to Latin America and Mexico and is strengthening its existing routes and seeking out new destinations.  It is expanding and improving airport facilities throughout the region, including gates, ticket counters and Admirals Clubs.  American is giving employees the resources they need by, creating marketing partnerships with Latin carriers to expand its competitive presence, developing a new world-class hub terminal for its Latin gateway in Miami, and operating one of the finest fleets in the world to Latin America.

American has continued to grow its service in Latin America in 2010 it began service from New York-JFK to San Jose, Costa Rica and to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and from Dallas-Fort Worth to San Salvador, El Salvador and Rio.  It also began serving Brasilia, Brazil’s capital from Miami, the sixth destination for American in the country. 

In February 2011 American Eagle began service to two new destinations in Mexico –Queretaro and Veracruz and in June 2011 American Eagle is scheduled to begin service to Mazatlan and Morelia.

American has applied to begin service to Manaus in 2012.


LATIN AMERICAN/MEXICAN DESTINATIONS

MEXICO CENTRAL AMERICA SOUTH AMERICA

Acapulco
Aguascalientes*
Cancun
Chihuahua*
Cozumel**
Guadalajara**
Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo
Leon*
Los Cabos
Mazatlan***
Mexico City
Monterrey
Morelia***
Puerto Vallarta
Queretaro*
San Luis Potosi*
Torreon*
Veracruz*

Belize City, Belize
Guanacaste, Costa Rica
Guatemala City, Guatemala
Managua, Nicaragua
Panama City, Panama
San Jose, Costa Rica
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
San Salvador, El Salvador
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Bogota, Colombia
Brasilia, Brazil
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Cali, Colombia
Caracas, Venezuela
Guayaquil, Ecuador
La Paz, Bolivia
Lima, Peru
Maracaibo, Venezuela
Medellin, Colombia
Montevideo, Uruguay
Quito, Ecuador
Recife, Brazil
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Salvador da Bahia, Brazil
Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Santiago, Chile
Sao Paulo, Brazil

* American Eagle service
** American and American Eagle service
*** American Eagle service scheduled to begin on June 8, 2011


COUNTRIES SERVED IN LATIN AMERICA

SOUTH AMERICA CENTRAL AMERICA  
Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama


Revised: May 2011